Mythbusters – Internship Edition

WE HAVE TO HAVE HEAPS OF MONEY TO AFFORD AN INTERN ** MYTH

Interns need their day-to-day living expenses covered. A family in your church might host and feed them, someone might have a bicycle they could use and you might give around $50/week for out of pocket expenses.

AN INTERN WILL LAUNCH NEW PROJECTS THAT ARE NOT SUSTAINABLE LONG TERM ** MYTH

Interns will often love to start new projects and serve in areas of need, but your job is to ensure the intern is given tasks that are sustainable in the long run, either enhancing existing ministries, or developing new ones alongside local volunteers.

AS A SOLE, PART TIME PASTOR I CAN’T FULLY SUPPORT AN INTERN ** TRUTH

Interns need a wide range of ministry experiences, learning from a variety of leaders five days per week. They will need a church office to work from and at least one full-time Pastor to oversee their work.

AN INTERN WILL DO ALL THE JOBS I DON’T HAVE TIME TO DO ** MYTH

An intern will be able to do some of what you don’t have time to do, if the task falls within their abilities and enhances their ministry experience.

AN INTERN WILL ADD TO MY WORKLOAD ** TRUTH

You will need to have a weekly supervision meeting with your intern to give and receive feedback, but you can also delegate supervision of some tasks to volunteer leaders. Moreover, interns are selected for their skills, capabilities and enthusiasm, and should be willing and able to work independently.

HOSTING AN INTERN FROM OVERSEAS MIGHT LEAD TO CROSS CULTURAL DIFFICULTIES  ** TRUTH

Whenever someone travels overseas they experience new and different things. Some may prove challenging for the intern, and might cause conflict. We do our best to prepare, support and help both you and the intern through these challenges.

INTERNSHIPS NEGLECT LOCAL TALENT  **  MYTH

We encourage Australians interested in gaining ministry experience to apply for an internship through this program. However, if you are hosting an intern from overseas, you can enhance your ministry as you learn from another cultural perspective.

Questions? Send them to Rachel Mayer